The Nordic Quest

Cristian Alarcon

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    The Aspen Valley Ski and Snowboard Club (AVSC) is a group of skiers and snowboarders that practice and compete in downhill skiing, nordic skiing, and snowboarding. This group is filled with students from all over the valley that come together to do something they love. The team is a great place for students to make friendships, be a part of something, and enjoy the world class outdoor terrain in our backyard.

     The Nordic Team is one major division of AVSC. This team is made up of cross-country skiers. The practices last about two hours and occur four to five days a week, with two days off. Competitions are about 2 hours long. Players are expected to be there early for warm up.

    The competition distances range from 5 to 30 kilometers. There are three types of competitions: freestyle, classic and mixed relay. According to REI, freestyle is a technique where the skier keeps the tips apart and the tails together and gets the kick by pushing off the inside edge of alternating skis.  Classic involves skiing in a track. You can classic ski on groomed and track-set snow at nordic areas or on un-groomed snow in the backcountry.  Mixed relay involves a range of events.  In the mixed relay, the first relay member from each respective competing team start in one simultaneous start. The remaining three team members start in the relay hand-over zone when the finishing team member enters the zone and touches the team member who is taking over.

    “Since I’ve joined the nordic ski team, my athleticism has greatly increased, I’ve made great friendships both in my and other schools, and I’ve realized how passionate I am in XC(Cross-Country) skiing” said Junior Andrew Humble.

    People that are in the program are happy with the environment and structure. Nordic skiing allows people to go out, get some exercise and get reduce stress. Yet, when competing with  rivals, these athletes give all they’ve got.

   This program is great for increasing skill, but also for building character.

  “I also try to show who I am as a person and positively represent my team by being a decent person and by not becoming a negative influence on the team,” stated Andrew Humble.

    There are some challenge about being on the Nordic Team compared to other Glenwood Springs High School(GSHS) sports. Practices usually take place in Aspen, requiring extensive travel that might be challenging for some. Another challenge that comes with joining the team are the prices of the programs. Skiing program fees to join a team are over $1,500 and boot camps cost $500 for people over the age of 12.  

    “There is still nothing that I don’t like about the nordic program, except for the expenses of the program,” said Junior Henry Barth.

    Their last competition of the season will take place on February 22 in Leadville, CO. It will be a freestyle event. Go cheer for our fellow students as they finish the season strong.

(Calendar)

 

 

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